Shared leadership

Definitions[ edit ] Shared leadership can be defined in a number of ways, but all definitions describe a similar phenomenon:

Shared leadership

Leadership can be explored as a social process — something that happens between people. It is not so much what leaders do, as something that arises out of social relationships.

As such it does not depend on one person, but on how people act together to make sense of the situations that face them. It is happening all the time. Michele Erina Doyle and Mark K.

Smith explore the theory and practice of shared leadership — and the significance of ethical practice. There was a whole group leadership thing. I want to work in a situation where people can take on roles and responsibilities, tasks, whatever they want to do.

Everyday leadership If we look at everyday life — the situations and groups we are involved in — then we Shared leadership find leadership.

Friends deciding how they are going to spend an evening, families negotiating over housework — each involve influence and decision.

However, such leadership often does not reside in a person. It may be shared and can move. In one situation an individual may be influential because of their expertise or position, in another it can be someone completely different.

Shared leadership

What these people may be able to do is to offer an idea or an action that helps to focus or restructure the situation — and the way in which others see things.

Sometimes there may not even be one person we can readily label as leader — just a group working together to achieve what is wanted. Rather than people leading, it is ideals and ideas. Through listening and contributing, thoughts and feelings emerge and develop.

It is not the force of personality that leads us on, but the rightness of what is said. Other factors may also operate. From this we can see that it is not our position that is necessarily important, but our behaviour.

The question is whether or not our actions help groups and relationships to work and achieve.

A Framework for Shared Leadership - Educational Leadership

Actions that do this could be called leadership — and can come from any group member. Many writers — especially those looking at management — tend to talk about leadership as a person having a clear vision and the ability to make it real.

However, as we have begun to discover, leadership lies not so much in one person having a clear vision as in our capacity to work with others in creating one. We may also recognize the power of self-leadership, as one worker put it: Such self-motivation and self-direction can impact on others.

The leadership process is part of our daily experience. We may lead others, ourselves, or be led. We play our part in relationships and groups where it is always around.

Nor are there always obvious followers.Shared leadership. Leadership can be explored as a social process – something that happens between people. It is not so much what leaders do, as something that arises out of social relationships.

Transitioning to shared leadership will inevitably change your relationship with your team. Many times, you will be missed. This may be obvious and openly expressed. literature, shared leadership, collective leadership, and distributed leadership are used interchangeably, while team leadership is commonly viewed as a slightly different stream of research (Avolio et al., ).

However, shared leadership definitions often include the term. team, coupled with the concept of a process, property, or phenomenon. A shared leadership model of governance means principals seek out others in their school to build partnerships, tap others' strengths, and jointly move the vision forward.

On the road to shared leadership, you may find that the top team begins relating differently across its boundaries, especially with managers one or two levels below. Proximity and frequent social interactions is a good way to develop shared leadership in a group. Shared leadership is a quite sophisticated social process so you will need to .

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